Cooking with the Hansens, Family, For kids, Health

Our Favorite Dairy Snacks – for June Dairy Month!

In honor of Dairy Month, we decided to show you a few of our favorite easy to make dairy snacks!

Smoothies: A great way to beat that nasty Iowa heat. Combine yogurt, milk, ice cubes and your favorite fruits and blend to make a tasty, refreshing treat! For an extra-thick smoothie with added calcium, include a spoonful of milk powder. For addition protein, toss in a spoonful of peanut butter with a banana and vanilla yogurt – yum yum!

Ice Pops: A great snack for kids on the go! Mix leftover smoothies from the above recipe or 100% fruit juice, yogurt and fruit like raspberries, strawberries or blueberries. Pour into ice cube trays and pop in the freezer for a sweet, frozen snack!

Parfaits: Parfaits are easily made by layering yogurt, fresh fruit and granola or chopped nuts. Looking for something a little different? Use cottage cheese in place of the yogurt!          Image (photo from blueprintforbeauty.com)

Mini Pizzas: A tasty, filling snack. Simply spread pizza sauce onto a whole grain English muffin and top with a small handful of shredded mozzarella cheese. For a heartier pizza, add lean hamburger, Canadian bacon and green peppers or mushrooms. Pop it in the oven for 3-5 minutes and enjoy your yummy, cheesy snack!

Fruit Pinwheels: Spread cream cheese and/or protein-packed peanut butter onto soft, whole grain tortillas. Add small pieces of fresh fruit, then roll and slice.

Quesadillas: Pack whole grain tortillas with shredded cheese, beans, corn, tomatoes and onions. You can also add cooked, cubed beef, pork or chicken. Heat in the microwave until cheese is melted. Serve with sour cream and salsa.                                                                                                                      Image (photo from babble.com)

Fruit Kebabs: Layer fruits like berries, melon and pineapple on a kebab stick. Serve with yogurt or a dip such as softened cream cheese with a touch of drizzled honey and a drop of vanilla.

Whole Grain Waffle Sticks: Transform messy whole grain waffles into an easy-to-eat handheld snack by slicing them into small rectangles. Serve with softened cream cheese and fruit spread.

For additional recipes and to learn more about dairy foods, dairy farms and healthy eating, check out these websites:

  • Midwestdairy.com
  • Dairyfarmingtoday.org
  • 3aday.org
  • Nutrientrichfoods.org

Leave your favorite dairy recipes in the comments below!

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Farm animals, For kids, Health, Product info, Quiz

Test Your Knowledge of Hansen’s Dairy!

This month, Hudson’s 4th grade class visited Hansen’s Dairy for an educational field trip. To test their listening skills, we put together this 20-question quiz.

Have YOU visited the Hansen’s farm lately? Want to test your knowledge about Hansen’s Farm Fresh Dairy? Give the quiz below a shot!

Or, if you’re curious to learn more about Hansen’s Dairy and their products, call 319-939-2187 to schedule a tour of the farm and creamery!

Hansen’s Farm Fresh Dairy Quiz  

1)      How much water does a cow drink in a day?

1 gallon                 20 gallons            40 gallons

2)      About how much food does a cow eat in a day?

90 lbs                             120 lbs                  140 lbs

3)      What is a baby kangaroo called?

Joey                              Kid                          Bobby

4)      Do male kangaroos have pouches?

Yes                 No

5)      What’s in the silos?

Corn silage                  Milk                       Beans

6)      About how much does a full grown dairy cow weigh?

1,000 lbs                       1,400 lbs               2,000 lbs

7)      What breed of cows do the Hansens have?

Holsteins     Guernseys          Angus

8)      How many times a day do the Hansens milk their cows?

Once                             Twice                    3 Times

9)      Where did the original wallabies come from?

New Zealand                      France                  United States

10)   How many stomachs does a cow have?

One                               Two                       Four

11)   Are cows herbivores or carnivores?

Herbivores                  Carnivores

12)   How long is a cow’s gestation period?

4 months                     9 months             12 months

13)   About how many gallons of milk does a cow produce each day?

10 gallons                    20 gallons            30 gallons

14)   At what temperature does the milk come out of the cow?

80 degrees                  101 degrees       202 degrees

15)   How big are calves when they’re born?

40-60 lbs                      80-100 lbs            120-140 lbs

16)   What is a young female cow called?

Heifer                           Guilt                      Filly

17)   What do the Hansen’s do with their bull calves?

Sell them                     Milk them           Keep them as pets

18)   What does pasteurization do?

Adds flavor                                 Removes the fat              Kills bacteria

19)   Which dairy product do the Hansen’s NOT produce?

Butter                           Cheese Curds                    Yogurt

20) How many teats (“spigots”) does an udder have?

3                              4                              5

Answers:

1) 40 gallons           2) 90 pounds                    3) Joey                  4) No

5) Corn Silage          6)  1,400                       7) Holsteins             8) Twice

9) New Zealand           10) Four                       11) Herbivores           12) 9 months

13) 10 gallons          14) 101 degrees           15) 80-100 pounds        16) Heifer

17) Sell them           18) Kills bacteria             19) Yogurt            20) 4

Family, Farm animals, Today on the Farm

A tribute to Daddy during June Dairy Month

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Daddy sharing his cows with Reese on his first Father’s Day. She’s a little scared in this photo but has really warmed up to them now.

Since today is Father’s Day, and June is National Dairy Month, I decided to share what makes my husband the best dairy daddy.

Blake loves showing our kids (Reese, 3, and Beckett, 1) all about being a farmer. Reese has already had a lot of hands-on experiences with cows and is discovering all the different aspects of raising them.

I love how he is instilling in our children (and his nieces and nephews) his love for animals. He is patient, caring, sensitive and kind, both in his work life and home life. He works hard until he gets the job done, then comes in and plays hard with the kids.

I love watching Blake be a dad. I would be proud if our kids grow up to be a farmer — or a parent — just like him.

Written by Jordan Hansen

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Reese feeding calves (and thinking the bottle is for her)
milking
Daddy lets Reese milk one of our most docile cows
wallabies
Part of doing chores means feeding the wallabies.
cowmagazine
Even inside the house, Reese enjoys looking at cows with Daddy.
beckettcalf
Beckett gets a closeup view of our 7-week premature calf Eyelash.

 

Uncategorized

“Live as though you’ll die tomorrow, farm as if you’ll live forever” Sustainability at Hansen’s Farm Fresh Dairy

Dairy farmers work diligently to uphold their legacy as good environmental stewards, and the Hansens are no different. Taking care of the land makes healthy cows, and healthy cows produce high quality milk. Most importantly, sustainability makes the world healthier for future generations. Here at Hansen’s Dairy, we implement many sustainability practices to help keep the planet healthy.

1) Water – The Hansens are very conscious of how they use water. When the cows are milked, milk comes out of the udder at 101°. A cooling system uses water to chill the milk to about 60°. This process helps keep the milk fresh from the farm to your refrigerator. That water is then recycled and given to the cows to drink.

2) Manure/Fertilizer – For every 1,000 pounds a dairy cow weighs, she’ll produce about 80 lbs. of manure each day. With 300 Holstein cows on the farm, that adds up quickly. Manure is cleaned out of the barns twice a day and pushed down a pipe that runs to a manure pit behind the barn. This pit holds 1 million gallons of manure. The manure is emptied from the pit twice a year, recycled and used on crops that are grown as feed for the cows, bringing its use full-circle.  The Hansen’s high-tech equipment injects the manure directly into the soil, minimizing the odor, runoff and atmospheric losses while adding rich nutrients to the soil and replenishing its fertility.

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3) Crop Rotation – The Hansens implement crop rotation to help replenish nitrogen in the soil. Crop rotation is also an important part of insect and disease control. Because many insects prefer to eat specific crops, continuous growth of the same crop gives them a steady food supply, and the insects’ population increases. To avoid this, the Hansens plant a field with alfalfa hay for four years and then corn for the next two years.

4) Conservation – The Hansens till their fields minimally and use contour and waterway systems to minimize topsoil erosion. When fields are frequently tilled, the topsoil becomes light and loose and can blow away in the wind. Contour farming minimizes erosion by planting crops around a hill, following its elevation contour lines, rather than planting in rows straight up the hill. These rows slow water run-off during rainstorms to prevent soil erosion and allow the water time to settle into the soil. Waterways provide paths for rainwater runoff to escape the field without taking precious topsoil with it.

5) Corn Usage – When the Hansens make silage for their cows to eat, they chop up the entire corn plant: stalk, leaves, corn, cob and all. This ensures none of the corn plant goes to waste. When the Hansens do harvest just the corn kernels, the rest of the plant is chopped up to make cornstalk bedding for the cows.

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The crops the Hansens take from the land to make feed for their cattle returns to the land as fertilizer in the form of manure. Being good land stewards, the Hansens try to make sure everything taken from the land is replenished.

Farm animals, Uncategorized

Twins – Twice the Fun!

Twins are very unusual in cattle, and if you’ve taken a tour of Hansen’s Dairy, you know that of the 200 calvings each year at Hansen’s, about five sets of twins will be born. Female twins born at Hansen’s will get matching names. For example, names of the female sets of twins on the farm have included Flip and Flop, French and Fry, Shoe and String, and Lois and Lane.

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But when a heifer and bull are twins, that heifer may be sold and raised for beef production instead of becoming a milking cow at Hansen’s Dairy. This is because 90% of the time that heifer will be sterile (unable to get pregnant). If she can’t get pregnant, she won’t be able to have a baby and produce milk.

When we tour guides tell our guests about this phenomenon, they often ask what causes this. After a little research, I found that these sterile heifers are called freemartins and that the heifer’s sterility is caused by blood vessels becoming interconnected between the heifer and bull. The blood then flows from one twin to the other, and male hormones like testosterone circulate and interfere with the heifer’s sexual development. The male hormones then masculinize the female twin, and the result is a sterile female.

Listed below are several interesting facts about freemartins.

· For the most part, the male twin is largely unaffected by sharing blood with his sister.

· Freemartins will have masculinized behavior and non-functioning ovaries.

· These heifers will behave and grow in a fashion similar to castrated male cattle (steers).

· It is very difficult to determine by palpation if the heifer will be fertile until she is about 6 months old.

· At any age, a simple blood test can be done to detect the presence of male Y-chromosomes in the white blood cells of the heifer to determine if she is sterile or not.

· In about 10 percent of different sex twins, no fusion of blood vessels takes place and the female remains fertile.

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· In fraternal twins, it’s possible to have two Holsteins with different colors. The photo shown is a Black & White Holstein with a Red carrier gene. She was bred to a Red & White bull and had a Black & White/Red & White twins.

· Freemartinism is the normal outcome of mixed-sex twins in all cattle species and also occurs in sheep, goats and pigs.